John Cale    Hanky Panky Nohow (Drone Remix)     1973

If the sashaying of gentlemen

Gives you grievance now and then

What’s needed are some memories of planing lakes

Those planing lakes will surely calm you down

Nothing frightens me more

Than religion at my door

I never answer panic knocking, falling

Down the stairs upon the law

What law?

There’s a law for everything

And for Elephants that sing to keep

The cows that agriculture won’t allow

Hanky Panky nohow

Hanky Panky nohow oh

Ezra Pound     Uncredited and Undated Photograph


Like a skein of loose silk blown against a wall 
She walks by the railing of a path in Kensington Gardens, 
And she is dying piece-meal 
                of a sort of emotional anemia. 
 
And round about there is a rabble         
Of the filthy, sturdy, unkillable infants of the very poor. 
They shall inherit the earth. 
In her is the end of breeding. 
Her boredom is exquisite and excessive. 
 
She would like some one to speak to her,         
And is almost afraid that I 
                will commit that indiscretion.
—Ezra Pound, “The Garden”  1917

Ezra Pound     Uncredited and Undated Photograph

Like a skein of loose silk blown against a wall

She walks by the railing of a path in Kensington Gardens,

And she is dying piece-meal

                of a sort of emotional anemia.

 

And round about there is a rabble         

Of the filthy, sturdy, unkillable infants of the very poor.

They shall inherit the earth.

In her is the end of breeding.

Her boredom is exquisite and excessive.

 

She would like some one to speak to her,         

And is almost afraid that I

                will commit that indiscretion.

—Ezra Pound, “The Garden”  1917

R. Crumb     Keep on Truckin’, from Zap Comix     1968

"I was totally amazed. This little home made underground comix thing was turning into a business before my eyes. It went from us going around Haight Street trying to sell these things we had folded and stapled ourselves to suddenly being a business with distributors, lawyers, contracts, and money talk. … The whole thing began to take on a heaviness that I believe had a negative effect on my work. I was only twenty-five years old when all this happened. It was a case of ‘too much too soon,’ I think. I became acutely self-conscious about what I was doing. Was I now a ‘spokesman’ for the hippies or what? I had no idea how to handle my new position in society! … Take Keep On Truckin’… for example. Keep on Truckin’… is the curse of my life. This stupid little cartoon caught on hugely. … I didn’t want to turn into a greeting card artist for the counter-culture! I didn’t want to do ‘shtick’—the thing Lenny Bruce warned against. That’s when I started to let out all my perverse sex fantasies. It was the only way out of being ‘America’s Best Loved Hippy Cartoonist.’" R. Crumb

R. Crumb     Keep on Truckin’, from Zap Comix     1968

"I was totally amazed. This little home made underground comix thing was turning into a business before my eyes. It went from us going around Haight Street trying to sell these things we had folded and stapled ourselves to suddenly being a business with distributors, lawyers, contracts, and money talk. … The whole thing began to take on a heaviness that I believe had a negative effect on my work. I was only twenty-five years old when all this happened. It was a case of ‘too much too soon,’ I think. I became acutely self-conscious about what I was doing. Was I now a ‘spokesman’ for the hippies or what? I had no idea how to handle my new position in society! … Take Keep On Truckin’… for example. Keep on Truckin’… is the curse of my life. This stupid little cartoon caught on hugely. … I didn’t want to turn into a greeting card artist for the counter-culture! I didn’t want to do ‘shtick’—the thing Lenny Bruce warned against. That’s when I started to let out all my perverse sex fantasies. It was the only way out of being ‘America’s Best Loved Hippy Cartoonist.’" R. Crumb

Harry Benson     R. Crumb on the Subway, New York City     1968


"My generation comes from a world that has been molded by crass TV programs, movies, comic books, popular music, advertisements and commercials. My brain is a huge garbage dump of all this stuff and it is this, mainly, that my work comes out of, for better or for worse. I hope that whatever synthesis I make of all this crap contains something worthwhile, that it’s something other than just more smarmy entertainment—or at least, that it’s genuine high quality entertainment. I also hope that perhaps it’s revealing of something, maybe. On the other hand, I want to avoid becoming pretentious in the eagerness to give my work deep meanings! I have an enormous ego and must resist the urge to come on like a know-it-all. Some of the imagery in my work is sorta scary because I’m basically a fearful, pessimistic person. I’m always seeing the predatory nature of the universe, which can harm you or kill you very easily and very quickly, no matter how well you watch your step. The way I see it, we are all just so much chopped liver. We have this great gift of human intelligence to help us pick our way through this treacherous tangle, but unfortunately we don’t seem to value it very much. Most of us are not brought up in environments that encourage us to appreciate and cultivate our intelligence. To me, human society appears mostly to be a living nightmare of ignorant, depraved behavior. We’re all depraved, me included. I can’t help it if my work reflects this sordid view of the world. Also, I feel that I have to counteract all the lame, hero-worshipping crap that is dished out by the mass-media in a never-ending deluge." R. Crumb

Harry Benson     R. Crumb on the Subway, New York City     1968

"My generation comes from a world that has been molded by crass TV programs, movies, comic books, popular music, advertisements and commercials. My brain is a huge garbage dump of all this stuff and it is this, mainly, that my work comes out of, for better or for worse. I hope that whatever synthesis I make of all this crap contains something worthwhile, that it’s something other than just more smarmy entertainment—or at least, that it’s genuine high quality entertainment. I also hope that perhaps it’s revealing of something, maybe. On the other hand, I want to avoid becoming pretentious in the eagerness to give my work deep meanings! I have an enormous ego and must resist the urge to come on like a know-it-all. Some of the imagery in my work is sorta scary because I’m basically a fearful, pessimistic person. I’m always seeing the predatory nature of the universe, which can harm you or kill you very easily and very quickly, no matter how well you watch your step. The way I see it, we are all just so much chopped liver. We have this great gift of human intelligence to help us pick our way through this treacherous tangle, but unfortunately we don’t seem to value it very much. Most of us are not brought up in environments that encourage us to appreciate and cultivate our intelligence. To me, human society appears mostly to be a living nightmare of ignorant, depraved behavior. We’re all depraved, me included. I can’t help it if my work reflects this sordid view of the world. Also, I feel that I have to counteract all the lame, hero-worshipping crap that is dished out by the mass-media in a never-ending deluge." R. Crumb